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The Malaysian Armed Forces (MAF, Malay: Angkatan Tentera Malaysia-ATM; Jawi:اڠكتن تنترا مليسيا), are the military of Malaysia, consists of three branches, namely the Malaysian Army, Royal Malaysian Navy and the Royal Malaysian Air Force.

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Malaysian Army - Avibras ASTROS II (Artillery SaTuration Rocket System)

ASTROS II (Artillery Saturation Rocket System) is a self-propelled multiple rocket launcher produced in Brazil by the Avibras company. It features modular design and employs rockets with calibers ranging from 127 mm to 450 mm. It was developed on the basis of a Tectran VBT-2028 6×6 all-terrain vehicle for enhanced mobility.

The Malaysian Army opeerates 3 regiments or 54 such systems.

teRvmdU.jpg

xCXCesu.jpg

 

 

 

 

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RMAF Hawk 208 light fighter with AGM-84 Harpoon ASM

6QUkbxn.jpg

Such capability is unheard of for Hawk 2xx aircraft. While Hawk is also used for maritime patrol, the ability to carry and launch Harpoon gives it a significant firepower upgrade compared to the smaller, shorter ranged AGM-65 Mavericks which it could also carry and used for anti ship purpose.

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1 hour ago, Operation BK said:

RMAF Hawk 208 light fighter with AGM-84 Harpoon ASM

6QUkbxn.jpg

Such capability is unheard of for Hawk 2xx aircraft. While Hawk is also used for maritime patrol, the ability to carry and launch Harpoon gives it a significant firepower upgrade compared to the smaller, shorter ranged AGM-65 Mavericks which it could also carry and used for anti ship purpose.

I have never seen such a small aircraft with SSM before. If the Bangladesh Air Force opts for Hawk Jets alongside EFT I think this type of armament should be integrated as a less costly option for maritime strike role.

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11 hours ago, Kris said:

RMAF Hawk 208 light fighter with AGM-84 Harpoon ASM

6QUkbxn.jpg

Such capability is unheard of for Hawk 2xx aircraft. While Hawk is also used for maritime patrol, the ability to carry and launch Harpoon gives it a significant firepower upgrade compared to the smaller, shorter ranged AGM-65 Mavericks which it could also carry and used for anti ship purpose.

This is a potent secondary capability alongside RMAFs F/A-18s. I truly love their air force.

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Something I've noticed time and time again and especially under Mahatir, Malaysia and Turkey are the only two countries that speak up about the plight of Muslims and don't bow down to western pressure unlike the Arab sellouts.

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On 1/24/2020 at 9:18 AM, Syed Amar Khan said:

I have never seen such a small aircraft with SSM before. If the Bangladesh Air Force opts for Hawk Jets alongside EFT I think this type of armament should be integrated as a less costly option for maritime strike role.

BAE sells the HAWK 208 as a separate single seat light aircraft aside from their regular Hawk trainers. Is it possible to have a trainer variant Hawk to act as a light attack aircraft with ashm firing capability?

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Just now, sibghat_99 said:

BAE sells the HAWK 208 as a separate single seat light aircraft aside from their regular Hawk trainers. Is it possible to have a trainer variant Hawk to act as a light attack aircraft with ashm firing capability?

I'm think we should opt for 16 of these jets for coastal defence purposes at Barisal. They could prove to be useful especially against a low tech force from Myanmar. 

We may use EFT to knock out their Su-30 and MiG-29 fleet leaving Hawk's to pick off Myanmar Navy warships.

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1 minute ago, Syed Amar Khan said:

I'm think we should opt for 16 of these jets for coastal defence purposes at Barisal. They could prove to be useful especially against a low tech force from Myanmar. 

We may use EFT to knock out their Su-30 and MiG-29 fleet leaving Hawk's to pick off Myanmar Navy warships.

This might be a good deal since BAE Hawk acquisition is mandatory for any EFT purchase

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1 hour ago, Syed Amar Khan said:

I'm think we should opt for 16 of these jets for coastal defence purposes at Barisal. They could prove to be useful especially against a low tech force from Myanmar. 

We may use EFT to knock out their Su-30 and MiG-29 fleet leaving Hawk's to pick off Myanmar Navy warships.

Is the purchase of EFT imminent? EFT as in Euro Fighter Typhoon?

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8 hours ago, Salted Cola said:

Is the purchase of EFT imminent? EFT as in Euro Fighter Typhoon?

yes Euro fighter Typhoon. As far as I know, most sources anticipating the upcoming 16 planes to be  either EFT or F-16 block 70/72. Some less reliable sources also claiming it will be mig-35, but I don't think that is true. 

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1 hour ago, ssud11 said:

yes Euro fighter Typhoon. As far as I know, most sources anticipating the upcoming 16 planes to be  either EFT or F-16 block 70/72. Some less reliable sources also claiming it will be mig-35, but I don't think that is true. 

Oh yes, Mig is extremely unlikely.... If they were going for Mig they'd have done so a long time ago.

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On 1/24/2020 at 7:58 AM, Kris said:

Malaysian Army - Avibras ASTROS II (Artillery SaTuration Rocket System)

ASTROS II (Artillery Saturation Rocket System) is a self-propelled multiple rocket launcher produced in Brazil by the Avibras company. It features modular design and employs rockets with calibers ranging from 127 mm to 450 mm. It was developed on the basis of a Tectran VBT-2028 6×6 all-terrain vehicle for enhanced mobility.

The Malaysian Army opeerates 3 regiments or 54 such systems.

teRvmdU.jpg

xCXCesu.jpg

 

 

 

 

If I am not wrong, the same system was used in Gulf War by Iraqi army.

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On 1/28/2020 at 1:59 PM, Rashid Rahman said:

If I am not wrong, the same system was used in Gulf War by Iraqi army.

 Iraq had 66 Astros II (also built under licence as the Sajil-60). Only with rockets of shorter range SS-40 and SS-60.

Range in indirect fire mode (first figure is minimum range):

  • SS-30: 9–30 km
  • SS-40: 15–35 km
  • SS-AV-40: 15–40 km
  • SS-60: 20–60 km
  • SS-80: 22–90 km
  • SS-150: 29–150 km
  • FOG MPM: 5–60 km
  • AV-TM 300: 30–300 km
  • Armour: classified. Probably light composite to give protection against small-arms fire.
  • Armament: one battery of 4, 16 or 32 rocket-launcher tubes
  • Performance:
  • fording 1.1 m
  • vertical obstacle 1 m
  • trench 2.29 m
  • Ammunition Type: High explosive (HE) with multiple warhead
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  • 1 month later...

kjFQMC6.jpg

ryobfzB.jpg

These photos show two helicopters that might not be serving in the Malaysian armed forces–if the country’s defense budget had been larger. At the top is a smartly painted Sikorsky S-61A-4 Nuri (Malaysian for “parrot”) that the Malaysian Army took over from the Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) last year. It is one of 44 that the RMAF received nearly 50 years ago. They were partially replaced in 2012-13 when the RMAF acquired 12 new EC725 Caracals from Eurocopter. But 28 of the long-serving Nuris are being retained–16 by the RMAF and 12 that are being transferred to the Army. With an average 14,000 flying hours logged, Malaysian defense officials say this fleet can fly on for at least another 15 years. Their avionics are being upgraded by AIROD, the leading Malaysian MRO. 

An unusual adaptation of the Eurocopter AS555 Fennec, bottom, that has been flying with Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) since 2004. It is equipped with a Telephonics 1500 maritime surveillance radar, a FLIR, and a door-mounted machine gun (Telephonics is here at Stand Q87). A naval officer told AIN that six were acquired when it became clear that the RMN could afford only six of the more capable AgustaWestland Super Lynx Mk300 naval helicopters. That machine has more powerful radar and weapons. But the officer said the Fennecs have served well, with an AIS datalink and a radar that can track-while-scan 22 targets. 

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2 hours ago, Kris said:

kjFQMC6.jpg

ryobfzB.jpg

These photos show two helicopters that might not be serving in the Malaysian armed forces–if the country’s defense budget had been larger. At the top is a smartly painted Sikorsky S-61A-4 Nuri (Malaysian for “parrot”) that the Malaysian Army took over from the Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) last year. It is one of 44 that the RMAF received nearly 50 years ago. They were partially replaced in 2012-13 when the RMAF acquired 12 new EC725 Caracals from Eurocopter. But 28 of the long-serving Nuris are being retained–16 by the RMAF and 12 that are being transferred to the Army. With an average 14,000 flying hours logged, Malaysian defense officials say this fleet can fly on for at least another 15 years. Their avionics are being upgraded by AIROD, the leading Malaysian MRO. 

An unusual adaptation of the Eurocopter AS555 Fennec, bottom, that has been flying with Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) since 2004. It is equipped with a Telephonics 1500 maritime surveillance radar, a FLIR, and a door-mounted machine gun (Telephonics is here at Stand Q87). A naval officer told AIN that six were acquired when it became clear that the RMN could afford only six of the more capable AgustaWestland Super Lynx Mk300 naval helicopters. That machine has more powerful radar and weapons. But the officer said the Fennecs have served well, with an AIS datalink and a radar that can track-while-scan 22 targets. 

In your post, top one is Eurocopter AS555 Fennec and bottom one is Sikorsky S-61A-4 Nuri.

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